Predictable Reaction To DOI Report

April 30, 2010

The reaction from the Fitial Administration and legislators concerning the Department of Interior's Recommendation to Congress was predicatable. Assistant Secretary Babauta presented the report to Lt. Governor Eloy Inos and other officials in the governor's conference room yesterday. The governor did not attend because of "a family matter."

The lt. governor said that comments from the executive office would be expressed after reviewing the report.

Cinta Kaipat, the Governor's neice andthe Deputy Secretary of Labor was quoted by the Marianas Variety:

Deputy Labor Secretary Cinta Kaipat, for her part, expressed concern that there were not enough consultations made to the local government and its people before the recommendations were made.

“I don’t think you have spent any time at all listening to the indigenous people,” she said and added that Interior’s report is premature at best.

“Our people here are in need of jobs,” she added and noted that improving the status of long-term guest workers would mean the local workforce would be competing with them for job opportunities.
To call the report "premature" is a really big stretch since the law passed two years ago and the Fitial Administration has been complaining about the report since then. The local government denied the U.S. access to statistics and data, in what I believe was an attempt to stall the report. That fact was even stated in the report. Additionally, Governor Fitial asked for the report deadline to be extended when he testified at the House hearing in May 2009. It is clear that the local government suspected what the recommendations would be, and wanted to delay the release of the report.

Kaipat's complaint that the "indigenous people were not given enough time to consult and make recommendations is also utter nonsense. Two years is pleny of time. As a human rights advocate, I began asking for status for the guest workers immediately after the bill passed. I traveled to Washington, DC several times to talk to officials face-to-face, sent letters and emails, and organized petition and letter drives. I attended the hearing and submitted testimony. So how were people not afforded opportunities to express their views? All they had to do was to take initiative, make certain that their opinions were expressed, and actively participate.

As for not listening to "indigenous people" that is also not true. A delgation of members of the U.S. Congress and staffers led by Rep. Nick Rahall, II travelled to the CNMI last year to meet with and get input from a variety of groups, including many indigenous people. Former Rep. Tina Sablan submitted written testimony for the May 2009 hearing urging the Congress to grant status to the foreign workers. Many other indigenous people signed our petitions and penned letters.

In regard to Kaipat's complaint that the workers could take jobs from the locals, she should reread the declaration that she submitted to Judge Paul Freidman as part of the wasteful anti-federalization lawsuit. She claimed that every worker would be needed to sustain the CNMI economy, and complained that the bad federalization would remove them. The lawsuit fought against their removal and for local control of the broken system. The reality is that the CNMI only wants the foreign workers if they remain disenfranchised and are under the local control. This point is further illustrated by the unconstitutional law PL 17-1, which attempts to violate federeal law by imposing authority over the foreign workforce.

The Saipan Tribune reported:
Deputy Labor Secretary Cinta Kaipat and House Vice Speaker Felicidad Ogumoro expressed disappointment with the report and its recommendation, citing a lack of study on the recommendation's impact on the indigenous Chamorro and Carolinian population and lack of consultation with the local government and the indigenous residents.

But Babauta said there had been numerous meetings, consultations and hearings both in Washington, D.C. and the CNMI.

Babauta repeatedly said that the recommendation contained in the 20-page “Report on the Alien Worker Population in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands” by the Interior secretary “is consistent with U.S. immigration and nationality laws.”

Ogumoro and Kaipat said indigenous residents will have more difficulty competing with foreign workers for private sector jobs should Congress agree to Interior's recommendations.

Unlike the public sector where nepotism and polical favors determine which employees are hired, employers in the private sector will hire the most qualified and experienced candidates reagrdless of whether they are local or foreign-born.

While Assisatnt Secretary Babauta was presenting the report to officials on Capital Hill, Federal Ombudsman Pamela Brown was presenting it to the workers and community leaders at the federal ombudsman office. Among thos attending were former Rep. Tina Sablan, Sister Stella, several Saipan attorneys, and leaders of guest worker groups.

Guest workers had positive reactions to the news. One said it was "the answer to years of prayer," while another said that he "always knew that the U.S. would do the right thing."

Workers who I talked to by phone or who emailed me were unanimous in stating that they hoped for U.S. citiznehsip or a direct path without any restrictions such as having to remain in the CNMI more years, being offered an FAS-type status, or any status that did not provide for full political and social rights.

See KSPN News for video coverage of the meeting.

44 comments:

The Saipan Blogger said...

I liked when they said they wouldn't oppose it as long as it wasn't forced on them.

Anonymous said...

Premature is the new hot button word for the governor and his cronies. Oscar Babauta just used it to defend the contract that he sole sourced to Felix Nogis. He said any reference to his criminal past was "premature". LOL. I guess that mean to wait until he commits a crime again before referencing his past.


As for Cinta's "premature" description, maybe someone should read the law to her. DOI was required by law to submit these recommendations and this report on or before May 10, 2010. I think the proper adjective is "timely".

Indigenous consultation? The governor stated publicly that he would not oppose a recommendation to grant status. That is what is recommended. Cinta and Ogamuro could have submitted a flurry of comments, suggestions, letters, etc to DOI in the past two years. Unless they didn't read the law and did not know that this report was being created. Maybe that is why Cinta did not give DOI the data. She had no idea what they were doing or who they were. LOL

Anonymous said...

There is a comment in the Tribune that I really like and it says "Interior recommends US citizenship for long-term foreign workers, not Chamorro or Carolininan citizenship. Why are they opposing that?" Why, why, why Fitial and Cinta???

Anonymous said...

How many thousand unskilled workers would the CNMI benefit from? Suppose the Congress gives Green cards to 16,000 aliens. How many will stay? How many will find jobs? How many will bring family members from Philippines, Bangladesh, etc., further swelling the ranks of the unskilled? How many will wind up collecting food stamps, getting free medical services at CHC, driving down wages for private sector jobs, and being a drain on local resources, rather than a gain?

I am for some type of improved immigration status, but it must be rational, not basede on emotion. It has to be good for the CNMI, as well as the workers. Until you can fairly answer the questions above, you should not be too quick to grant status.

Anonymous said...

Decisions will be at the hands of the U.S. Congress. if a bill is passed then long-term nonresident workers will equally share the benefits of federal grants may it be in heath, social, education etc etc. Then, everybody will live happily ever after including myself. Wow, a great ending for what we envisioned before as only a "fairy tale". More prayers!

Anonymous said...

If most of the contract workers go to Guam and the mainland, the indigenous will still be able to find jobs here.

If they all stay, it will be devastating to the indigenous employment rate and the social service network -- food and medical, which is run on a block grant basis, not nearly as generous as in the mainland.

Make no mistake, the indigenous will suffer severely from the status grant. Especially the poor locals!

Wendy comments that, unlike Hawaii or the Native Americans, the locals invited the outsiders here. Hello! Not the poor locals, only the connected!

So basically, Wendy is endorsing a cruel oppression of the indigenous minority simply because of a few greedy leaders she herself recognizes are corrupt. Outrageous!

Congress should insist on some sort of a survery of the intentions of the foreign national workers before granting them status.

Or else increase the indigent medical and food support to the same level as if the CNMI were a state. Otherwise, the poor Chamorros and Refaluwasch are going to get a very raw deal!

Anonymous said...

Noni 11:05 said ---"So basically, Wendy is endorsing a cruel oppression of the indigenous minority simply because of a few greedy leaders she herself recognizes are corrupt. Outrageous!"

What's outrageous is blaming Wendy for something she never said. When did she endorse oppression of anyone?! Who is oppressing the indigenous minority? WTF?

Who elected and re-elected and re-elected and re-elected the connected and corrupt officials that made the decisions? Who failed to impeach or remove them? Who supported them and still supports them? Who attacked the people who tried to point out what was happening? Who sat around and allowed this to happen because it was "good for the economy?" Who still fails to remove corrupt officials from office? Here's a hint. It's not Wendy.

How the hell will anyone suffer from status? Stop the spin demented one.

You are seriously suggesting some kind of surveys? Are you for real? They can write whatever they think anyone wants to hear. Enough with the the bull s**t. Grant the status already.

RED OCTOBER said...

THEY STILL WANT THE GUEST WORKERS NOSE TIED,PLAIN AND SIMPLE.

Anonymous said...

Oh the poor indigenous people of the CNMI. Give me a break. Where was your concern when WE, OUR OWN GOVERNMENT, brought in over 100,000 foreign workers over the past 20 years? Where was your grave concern for "driving down wages" when we opted to bring in foreign workers for any job at any time rather than to simply fill gaps? Where was your concern when temporary guest workers were allowed to stay in the CNMI for years on end, some over 20 years, without any concern for the impact on the island or the workers themselves?

Take your spin elsewhere!

Anonymous said...

I can't believe Angelo ran for mayor. He seems terribly uninformed.

Anonymous said...

To Cinta and alliance,

Stop fooling around, your majesty are over. So please accept the reality that everyone in this world are all the same no one is ABOVE him (GOD)so PLEASE give them a chance to live with happily ever after . Our situation before are exactly the same as the Guest Workers now. Don't be greedy share your blessing . ADIOS CINTA.

Anonymous said...

11:05

You are a real dumb ass plain and simple. Such spin. Are you an attorney? Bellas, Siemer Willens or some other opportunistic attorney, perhaps?

Wendy never said anything of the sort. The poor indigenous people were the ones who brought the workers here. They either passed laws or elected those who did. Then they sat back and watched everything unravel and go to hell. The whole time they blamed the workers and advocates like Wendy. Sort of like NOW where Fitial the AG, DOL, Seimer and WIllens act like some evil characters with an army of Orks trying to destroy so they can keep their throne.

When the poor Chamorros and Refaluwasch, the REAL oppressors, get off of their asses and DO SOMETHING to end the corruption, theft and illegal power plays then maybe you can complain. Otherwise shut the hell up or say something that is not a lie.

Anonymous said...

Remember a 1 year contract for guest workers. Remember renewals of contracts for those that worked hard enough to deserve it. Remember how much many employers gave in addition to wages, i.e. medical, quarters, food, etc (not all got this). Remember once U.S. Citizenship is granted, those will be no more. Remember you will lose you home country citizenship and Dual Citizenship is a thing of the past. Remember that this ruling only entitles you to APPLY for U.S. Citizenship. If you look at the application, any convictions here or in your home country will disqualify you. Any associations with undesirables (memberships, clubs, some protests, known criminals, etc. Remember, guest workers will be no more and no more will be allowed to come here for work. Remember you will no longer be able to send most of your money home as you will need every penny of it to survive with the cost of living here or in the States or Guam. Remember to start a new business as a U.S. Citizen requires capital and it is not that easy to open a business that there are already so many of. Remember that minimum wage is rising so this will limit the amount of food stamps you are entitled to based on your income. Remember there will be some resentment among the locals and this could affect hiring or simply termination as all contract will become void once you become a Citizen. Remember the CNMI is not the U.S. and the Indigenous peoples are very restrictive on what Non Bloodlines are not permitted to do a lot of things that Indigenous can do, for example, purchase and own land. Remember you are outsiders and will be treated as such until the day you leave.

Anonymous said...

7:09

Remember NMI doesn't have enough locals to fill jobs? Remember you need foreign workers? Remember we marry locals and already own land? Remember we know you are selfish and treat us like outsider? Remember you can go to hell for your hatred and racism? Remember we can leave and you can do your own jobs?

Anonymous said...

Lol, We treat you like outsiders because you are. You seem to forget where you came from and what you are here for. You came here to work and send money home. Not to take over.

Anonymous said...

What's with the "us v. them, we v. you" crap? That's one of the worst consequences of the guest worker program: it has created divisions, or the delusion of division, in the community, not to mention a ton of false pride, xenophobia, and racism.

Noni 7:09 and 8:10 - Wake up and realize that the guest worker program as the CNMI has known it is dead. Wake up and realize that that is actually a good thing. Wake up and realize that the people who are labeled as "outsiders" are really our neighbors, spouses, children, colleagues, teachers, students, parishioners, teammates, and friends.

Wake up and realize that the CNMI will forever be a cesspool as long as the majority of its U.S. citizens work for a corrupt and fear-mongering government, and as long as the majority of its bonafide residents who work in the private sector are forever labeled as "outsiders," and "temporary guest workers" who should "remember where they came from" and are forever threatened with the threat of going "home."

Wake up and realize that for the 15,000+ people who have lived here for more than five years (and many for more than ten years), this IS their home.

Wake up and realize that granting status to people who have come to call this place home will be one enormous stride toward making the CNMI a REAL democracy. Because right now, there is NO democracy, and the system of government here is a sham and an embarrasment for all of us.

Wendy said...

Anonymous 9:26

Thank you for the great response. I was just going to respond, but you said everything I wanted to say more eloquently than I could.

Anonymous said...

Anon 9:26

Thanks for proving my point. Your post is a great example of something that feels good, but doesn't address the issues. It's emotional (democracy is good, giving green cards to abused workers is 'fair'), not rational.

How would it be good for workers to be naturalized and tied to a place (at least under the two recommendations for CNMI-only status) with very few jobs? How would it be good for the CNMI's economy (and the standard of living for all its residents) to have 15,000 new permanent residents, many of whom are unskilled workers? What skills are needed here in the next 10 years, and how many of each worker in each skill set can reasonably be forecast as necessary? The law of supply and demand dictates that a glut of unskilled workers will keep wages down, which is why the CNMI's politicos/Chamber types kept bringing workers in by the thousands. The question now is will you perpetuate that model, or let the market begin to assert itself, raise wages and attract more U.S. workers, and supplement the workforce with only as many foreign workers as are needed to fill jobs that US citizens can't or won't do?

Wendy, my ancestors, like yours, came over with very little. They worked hard, and prospered. But this is not 1900, it's 2010. Manufacturing, construction, roadbuilding and farming--occupations that require strong backs and not much education--are no longer dominant features of our economy. We have a largely service-based economy now. Lots of our foreign workers are accountants, nurses, doctors, computer techs, etc., We should make it easy for them to become permanent residents, because we need those skills, not because we feel sorry for them.

Wendy said...

Anonymous 10:58

Did I say I feel sorry for the foreign contract workers, therefore they should have status? No,I did not. Who are all you anonymous commenters that attempt to put words in my mouth?!

It would be ridiculous to tie the workers to the CNMI or to inflict other conditions on status. They should be granted U.S. citizenship or an unobstructed pathway to citizenship. They should be able to choose whether or not they want to stay and work in the CNMI (those with secure jobs, most likely will) or whether they want to move to the mainland or Guam where there are more jobs and opportunities.

the teacher said...

The worst of the five possible options is the one that would freeze workers in the CNMI. That option is against the laws of supply and demand and should never be considered. The other options allow for travel, which is decent and should be enacted in time to support th military build-up.

Anonymous said...

what will happen to those 5years below?

joey said...

what will happen to those 5years and below?

Anonymous said...

anon 7:09 a.m.

1. remember that u were not a US citizen before
2. remember that you were just lucky, US citizenship were just given to you although you did not work hard to get it
3. remember that you dont have your own currency
4. remember that you're not the one giving the "qualified" guest workers the "status" but the US congress
5. remember when the road was still dusty and not paved?
6. remember when MTC charge so much for phone calls?
7. remember that you will die too and you have to be good before you can go to heaven
8. remember that no man is an island
9. remember the golden rule
10. remember that the world is round, things can turn around and unthinkable can happen. may i remind you if God wanted something to happen that it can happen. if the sea just come up and eat the land thru earhtquakes and tsunami, your island can easily be washed out.

a lot of things for you to remember. some more bloggers will surely post something more for you to remember.

Anonymous said...

Anon 10:58,

You're an idiot. I say this from the most dispassionate, strictly rational perspective possible, based on a logical analysis of everything you just said.

1. You haven't made any point, so there is really nothing that anyone can "prove."

2. No one should not be "tied" to the CNMI, and certainly not after being granted status. The only person who has suggested that on this site is you, in making your strawman argument.

2. The CNMI will not be gaining 15,000 "new" permanent residents. They're not really "new" if they're already here, and have been here for more than five years.

3. What skills are needed here? We need doctors, accountants, computer techs, yes. We also need to feed ourselves, so we need farmers and fishers too. We will always need to build and repair roads and infrastructure, so we need engineers, construction workers, and architects. We should really work on being less than totally dependent on every imports, so it would be great to have people with a diversity of manufacturing, agricultural, technical, and other skills - and yes, this would include those people you so arrogantly describe as "unskilled."

4. This "largely service-based" economy is a sorry economy. It is the product of unimaginative business and political leadership and a widespread mentality of dependence. It's nothing to celebrate, and certainly nothing to perpetuate.

5. You can't say that "lots" of foreign workers here are skilled doctors, accountants, computer techs, etc. and then describe that same group of people as largely unskilled.

6. Farmers, fishermen, manufacturers, and roadbuilders are skilled. Like ANY honorable occupation these jobs require education (though maybe not the kind of education you would respect) in order to be done successfully.

7. If you really believe in the free market as a mechanism for raising wages and the general level of prosperity, you would support permament status for foreign workers.

Thank god it wasn't up to you to decide whether our Carolinian ancestors could stay here when they arrived just a little over 100years ago. There were no jobs for them back then, and certainly no roads to build or hospitals to staff. They weren't even great farmers from what I've been told, but decent fishermen. You would probably would have told them to go back where they came from because they didn't have skills you could appreciate.

My ancestors, like yours, also had very little, and worked hard for everything they had. They taught me to respect the value of all honest work. Too bad yours didn't do the same.

Economies evolve, but we will always need to feed, clothe, and shelter ourselves, as well as have the ability to adapt to changing times and learn new skills. The CNMI of the future will need all the skills and adaptability of the people who are here today. We may even have room for more.

Anonymous said...

Anon 10:58,

You're an idiot. I say this from the most dispassionate, strictly rational perspective possible, based on a logical analysis of everything you just said.

1. You haven't made any point, so there is really nothing that anyone can "prove."

2. No one should not be "tied" to the CNMI, and certainly not after being granted status. The only person who has suggested that on this site is you, in making your strawman argument.

2. The CNMI will not be gaining 15,000 "new" permanent residents. They're not really "new" if they're already here, and have been here for more than five years.

3. What skills are needed here? We need doctors, accountants, computer techs, yes. We also need to feed ourselves, so we need farmers and fishers too. We will always need to build and repair roads and infrastructure, so we need engineers, construction workers, and architects. We should really work on being less than totally dependent on every imports, so it would be great to have people with a diversity of manufacturing, agricultural, technical, and other skills - and yes, this would include those people you so arrogantly describe as "unskilled."

4. This "largely service-based" economy is a sorry economy. It is the product of unimaginative business and political leadership and a widespread mentality of dependence. It's nothing to celebrate, and certainly nothing to perpetuate.

5. You can't say that "lots" of foreign workers here are skilled doctors, accountants, computer techs, etc. and then describe that same group of people as largely unskilled.

6. Farmers, fishermen, manufacturers, and roadbuilders are skilled. Like ANY honorable occupation these jobs require education (though maybe not the kind of education you would respect) in order to be done successfully.

7. If you really believe in the free market as a mechanism for raising wages and the general level of prosperity, you would support permament status for foreign workers.

Thank god it wasn't up to you to decide whether our Carolinian ancestors could stay here when they arrived just a little over 100years ago. There were no jobs for them back then, and certainly no roads to build or hospitals to staff. They weren't even great farmers from what I've been told, but decent fishermen. You would probably would have told them to go back where they came from because they didn't have skills you could appreciate.

My ancestors, like yours, also had very little, and worked hard for everything they had. They taught me to respect the value of all honest work. Too bad yours didn't do the same.

Economies evolve, but we will always need to feed, clothe, and shelter ourselves, as well as have the ability to adapt to changing times and learn new skills. The CNMI of the future will need all the skills and adaptability of the people who are here today. We may even have room for more.

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Wendy said...

Anonymous 8:10: Your comment says it all.

Teacher: The only status that should be awarded is any without conditions that would chain workers to the CNMI or deny them from having full political and social rights. That is why only the first two conditions are acceptable.

Joey -We have to wait to see if the US will grant those workers with less than five years the opportunity to have status when they reach 5 years. You must work to get a federal visa.

Anonymous said...

The federal genocide of the CNMI indigenous is a crime against humanity.

We invited the guest workers to help and support us, paying them well for their labor. And now the feds aid and abet them taking over our islands?!

The PI will not give one of their islands to us.

Stealing people's land, culture, and future is not going going to get you to heaven, and protecting our people will certainly not condemn us to the inferno.

Yes, you are rightfully happy about this amazing gift. But we should not suffer from our poor leaders.

You blame us for the corruption? Why weren't the feds prosecuting this corruption for 30 years, why only just recently?

This is a federal outrage. Kilili is honest, industrious, and hard working. Camacho is a self-interested, flip-flopping politician under the thumb of Fitial.

But if no one else will stand up for the indigenous people against this federal genocide, you are right, I will vote for Camacho!

Anonymous said...

Noni 7:55
what are you smoking?

1. "The federal genocide of the CNMI indigenous is a crime against humanity." What genocide? Are you insane?

2. "We invited the guest workers to help and support us, paying them well for their labor. And now the feds aid and abet them taking over our islands?!" paying them well. ha, ha, ha. Most never got what they were owed. and that low minimum wage is not a good wage. Ask people who still owe workers back wages. Hey, ask Glen Manglona how much he refuses to pay.Taking over the islands? Ha,ha.

3. "The PI will not give one of their islands to us." Why the h wh=ould the PI give anything to the CNMI but a big fat lawsuit for abusing thousands of their citizens?

4."Stealing people's land, culture, and future is not going going to get you to heaven, and protecting our people will certainly not condemn us to the inferno." Who stole ANYTHING From you? You are the thief. Pay all workers their back wages crooks!

5."Yes, you are rightfully happy about this amazing gift. But we should not suffer from our poor leaders." What gift? Who elected the leaders? Not the workers!!!

6. "You blame us for the corruption? Why weren't the feds prosecuting this corruption for 30 years, why only just recently?" Not true. The feds were the only ones who sued the large garment and others crooks. Not CNMI. CNMI law and labor is a joke.

7. "This is a federal outrage. Kilili is honest, industrious, and hard working. Camacho is a self-interested, flip-flopping politician under the thumb of Fitial.

But if no one else will stand up for the indigenous people against this federal genocide, you are right, I will vote for Camacho!"

You are an idiot. You think because you threaten someone they will do the wrong thing for your vote. Maybe Kilili has integrity. Maybe he's not a jerk like Camacho and Fitial and Covenant criminals. Maybe his votes can't be bribed or bought. A vote for Camacho is a vote for corruption and Fitial. Who's hurting the islands?

Anonymous said...

Noni 7:55am:

PLEASE VITE FOR CAMACHO!

I would not want your racist, hate-filled, delusional, insane, BS filled, manipulated and despicable vote to go to an honorable person like Kilili.

I am content to know that there are many more others that do not share your warped vision and your twisted mentality.

The only genocide that is occuring here on the islands is the CULTURAL GENOCIDE at your hands. The CNMI, Chamorro and Carolinian cultures do not share your sentiment and when you preach that crap you are attempting to destroy the true island culture of sharing, caring, love, respect, appreciation for our lands and our open arms to ALL those that visit our homes.

I should file a lawsuit against you and Glenn M for CULTURAL GENOCIDE!

Anonymous said...

9:31 anon.

can you be little bit easier on anon 7:55? idiot is the lowest (IQ 0-25), imbecile (IQ 26-50) or moron (IQ 51-70). he can at least write. bwa ha!ha! i think he meant by the gift is the "citizenship" but I agree with what you wrote.

Anon 7:55
how can anybody steal someone else's culture? culture can be adopted, and once adopted it will be widely known and will not perish as you meant. i don't even think you meant "amalgamation"? do you know the meaning of the word?

how can you steal a land if you paid for it. MORON!!!!

and last but not the least, how can you refute what somebody wrote "you were not US Citizen before". isn't it true? contract workers are not after chamorro citizenship. you can have it!

Anonymous said...

If you hired a worker to come to your house, then let him/her stay in an extra room for a month, then they said they wanted to stay with you even though you don't want them to. Who is wrong?

Workers were brought here to perform work and mostly for the Garment factories. None were forced to come and all knew that they were here for a limited time. They knew that after their contract was up, they had to leave.

Refusing to leave someones house or someones country simply because you don't want to, is plain selfish.

You came here to do a job. Once that job is done, you have to leave. How hard is that to understand? Read your contract.

Anonymous said...

"Read your contract."

Why didn't our local government read the contracts and the laws? Why did labor allow TEMPORARY GUEST workers the ability to remain in the CNMI for 20+years straight?

Using your analogy if I hired a temporary worker to work at my business from a temp agency and they performed their job well and I was happy with them and I asked the temp service to keep them on for a longer period of time and everyone agreed and months turned into years of having them work with me, I may alter their status and make them PERMANENT at my business. They may even request it. I may then consider and I may grant it.

WE LET TEMPORARY GUEST WORKERS come to the CNMI and ALLOWED them LEGALLY to stay here indefinitely for the last 20_ years.

If you had a guest stay in your home legally and with your consent for 20 damn years, if they washed clothed with your clothes, showered in your bath, shared food at your table, played with your kids, attended your social gatherings, cared for your house and cared for your family, would you really be able to "throw them out" after 20 damn years? after 10? after 5? Living under your roof. Protecting you and you protecting them. Going to the same church. Attending your funerals and you theirs.

If you would just kick them out because it is temporary than you actions are not those of my island culture.

Anonymous said...

Anon 1:40pm
My job is not done yet even I am here for more than 20 years! because it should always be performed else the economy will stop. Can you do my job if I'm gone? I am VERY VERY SURE you CANNOT.

Anonymous said...

1:40 So you want us to leave? Then stay silent and don't support status and we will be gone in 2014. Then look forward to closing CUC, CHC, some private schools, restaurants, beauty parlors and other businesses. Your tourist industry will disappear because you don't have enough trained workers for the hotels. Put away your cars and trucks, your roads will not be repaired. You will not have any new buildings or houses and the ones you have will not be repaired. If your car or air conditioner breaks it will not be repaired. Go back to fishing and living off the land. Enjoy!

Anonymous said...

Noni 1:40 Watch out, you may get what you wish for. We will not stay here if we dont get status and no one else will come. Good luck!

Anonymous said...

the cnmi cannot exist without foreign workers. no place in micronesia can.

Anonymous said...

Wendy:

What happened to my detailed, eight-point refutation of Anon 8:10, submitted at about 7:40 a.m. from Saipan? Censorship of dissenting views?

Wendy said...

Anonymous 8:10 No censorship. Please can you send it again? All comments in last week -every one have been posted!

Captain said...

I see another CUC style "emergency" coming in the area of "qualified" workers in relations to the jobs that are being "maintained" by the present workers.
Many are "crying" that these worker who have been here for many years already occupying skilled jobs that "locally" there are no qualified people available will somehow compete with the local workforce once they have Citizenship.
How? no change.
What will happen is like when the Legislature passed a law to eliminate contract worker at CUC and also got rid of the company that was doing the maintenance and overhauls that employed contract workers..
They had to enact another law to go back to the original terms to allow foreign workers to work at CUC.
This will be the scenario in the private sector when these workers get "status" and leave and there are many jobs available for the US local population that cannot be filled.
THEN what is going to happen? (A.Samoan labor? that is what it is building up to be, mark my words)
OR "H" visa workers under the Fed terms.
This will be a major cost to the business.
Too good, the house of cards is falling. So be it.

Anonymous said...

Even if we get green cards or US citizenship ,our purpose is not to stay here in a place where the so called "EEO" is not practice.
Please check the surety bond cases with the Ombudsman's record...Only 1/3 of the back wages are mostly paid by insurance companies, Is this the US of A style....

Anonymous said...
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Anonymous said...

Up until the umbrella permit, all work permits were for one year. At the end of that term, your employment was terminated. A JVA was posted prior to the end of your contract to all others to apply for that position based on qualifications, yeah right. I was interviewed for some of the JVA's that sounded like good jobs but it always came out to be just a forced process to interview any that applied. You already knew you were simply going to renew the existing worker. My point is that those that say they have been here for 20 years working have not been. They have been here for 1 year, 20 times. In the older times, every contract worker had to leave the CNMI and reapply for the position. Once the contract was in place, they could travel back to the CNMI and go back to work. Some group of rocket scientist came up with the concept that instead of making all exit and return as it was in the beginning, they changed the system to allow in place renewals. This relieved some of the financial burdens of the employer as well as the worker.

Many say that they have contributed so much to the economy here and I do agree. Their contribution was to steadily leech Hugh amounts of money from the CNMI to send it off island to their families in their home country. Alot cant sent all their money home as they have 2 families. One here and one there. Funny thing is that the one don'e know about the other. I don't think you can citizenship for 2 wives. That is one of the main reasons this economy is so fragile. We spend, you don't. Once any status is given, contracts will be voided as you will no longer be a contract worker. That means you will have to pay all your own expenses. That means instead of 90% of the money leaving the CNMI, 90% will stay here and the economy will rebound. We have a strong labor work force here in the CNMI. The problem is that making minimum wage is not enough to support your family as you are not provided housing allowance, food allowance, medical coverage, etc.

You think that the CNMI will implode once all guest workers leave. You could not be any more wrong. We will thrive. We will clean up the Mini Manila look you see in so many places. All the mini businesses will close as the exodus begins. I have no doubt that there will be maxed flights heading to the states and Guam. I have no doubt that very very many will bail and leave unpaid loans, rents, electric/water bills, cable, phone, vehicles, etc. Lets just hope all the thieves and drug dealers/organizations will go too. We can start using garapan for what it was intended and not a red district (whores and drugs at every corner and storefront).

I agree that it is time to pull the blood sucking leeches off the CNMI people and throw them back where they came from.

You have to go. You do not have to go home.

Wendy said...

Hater at 6:17

Your hateful, ignorant comment deserves no response.