PRESIDENT'S EXECUTIVE ACTION STAYS DREAMERS!

June 15, 2012

“As long as I’m president, I will not give up on this issue, not only because it’s the right thing to do for our economy … not just because it’s the right thing to do for our security, but because it’s the right thing to do period.”
–President Barack Obama, June 15, 2012

Photo by W. L. Doromal DREAM Act rally, Orlando 2010
While the U.S. Congress failed to pass comprehensive immigration reform or the DREAM Act, executive action has stopped deportations for some young immigrants. Today at 10:16am I received a text from Washington, DC that the White House granted relief to the DREAMers!

Across the nation 800,000 dreamers are celebrating. I hope some of the DREAMers in the CNMI have received the news, especially a young Filipino man who has been corresponding with me!

The DREAMers have been organized in seeking status, but in recent months they have stepped up their campaign to stay in the U.S. They sent letters, held protests, and came out of the shadows even making the cover of Time magazine.  The DREAMers have shown that organization, education and pushing the message can yield positive results.

If undocumented immigrants can be spared from deportation, then the foreign workers who have been in the CNMI for years and decades legally certainly must be granted permanent residency. The time is now for the CNMI foreign workers to again stand up and tell their story to the world – to send letters, protest and educate policy makers.

While this executive action in the form of prosecutorial discretion, is a positive step, it is just a step. Immigration reform is long overdue and desperately needed.




DHS Memo on Prosecutorial Discretion for DREAMers:

Statement from Senator Dick Durbin:
“The Obama Administration’s decision to extend temporary legal status to DREAM Act students is an historic humanitarian moment. This action will give these young immigrants their chance to come out of the shadows and be part of the only country they’ve ever called home. These young people did not make the decision to come to this country, and it is not the American way to punish children for their parents’ actions. I commend President Obama and Secretary Janet Napolitano for their courage and leadership. I also want to thank Senator Dick Lugar for having the courage to confront Tea Party orthodoxy and join me on a bipartisan basis to request this change in policy” “I first made this request of the Administration two years ago and renewed it with the support of 21 Senators last year. Because the House has refused to consider the DREAM Act and a filibuster blocked it in the Senate, this Presidential action was absolutely necessary to serve the cause of justice.” “For over a decade, I’ve been working to pass the DREAM Act – a bill that would give these immigrant students the chance to earn citizenship. I’m hopeful that today’s announcement will encourage Congress to meet our responsibility to pass the DREAM Act, and show, through the force of law, that our country continues to be a nation of immigrants. Two years ago, Senator Durbin and Senator Richard Lugar (R-IN) asked the Department of Homeland Security to suspend the deportations of DREAM Act students by granting them deferred action. With today’s announcement, the Administration has taken the exact steps the Senators requested in their 2010 letter. A copy of that letter can be found here. Last year, Durbin and Lugar were joined by 21 additional Senators, including Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV), in urging this change in deportation policy. A copy of that letter can be found here. Today’s announcement states that certain young people who were brought to the United States as young children, who do not present a risk to national security or public safety, and meet several key criteria will receive deferred action for a period of two years, subject to renewal, and will be eligible to apply for work authorization. The Administration’s new policy will apply to those who meet the following criteria:
  • Came to the United States under the age of sixteen
  • Have lived in the United States continuously for at least the last five years
  • Are in school, have graduated from high school, obtained a GED or are serving in the military.
  • Have not been convicted of a felony or significant misdemeanor.
  • Are 30 years old or younger.
What the Obama Administration has done in halting DREAM Act deportations is both perfectly appropriate and legal. Throughout our history, the government has decided who to prosecute – and who not to prosecute – based on law enforcement priorities, available resources and our national interests. The DREAM Act is a narrowly tailored bill to give undocumented students a chance to earn legal status if they came here as children, are long-term U.S. residents, have good moral character, and complete two years of college or military service in good standing. Senator Durbin first introduced the DREAM Act in 2001 and has reintroduced the legislation every Congress since then. Source: durbin.senate.gov

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

although this may sound like a good deal look at it closely. Must have come here before age 16, in school or graduated a U.S. highschool. Under age 30, no felonies, or multiple misdemeanors. This offers no status it is a prosecutorial discrection and we know how that has worked. What is worse is those in the house and senate who have stated they will not introduce any legislation because this complicates matters. An executive order can be recinded at any time. More political pandering with no fix. he has set back true immigration reform for at least several years.....

Wendy Doromal said...

8:01 This is a GOOD thing. It happened because we have a deadbeat, nonfunctioning Congress. A Congress that plays political games instead of getting to work on serious issues.

Anonymous said...

Noni 8:01 Looks like the anti-alien commenters woke up already. This is great news! No one is going to be deported unless they commit a crime, whether they are a young person or adult if you consider the Morton memo along with this. Legislation will follow.

Anonymous said...

more like dream on, this will be followed as closely as the morton memo on prosecutorial discretion with a wink and a nod from the WH administration. Just like things have been since the morton memo, they closed less than two percent of the cases they reviewed. people still get caught up in deportation. if people can't see that this is a pander for votes just like his support of gay marriage then they have blinders on... all this does is make it harder for those who planned to introduce legislation now stop and rethink it. Rubio, and several others have already said that. this is desperation for re-election at the expense of peoples lives. how many foreigners in the CNMI are in a four year college? how many minors were brought here before 16, are in HS or a four year college.....the numbers it will help is miniscule. And you think CIS is slow now on CWs wait until all these folks try to go see USCIS to ask about this everything will come to a halt. no chance for cnmi aliens to go to the US under this... made a serious problem just more complicated all for re-election. we need real change in the laws but that is shot to heck now,,,,Repubs get in and this goes away with all hope for real change..

Anonymous said...

I do not see how this will affect anybody in the NMI.
From the beginning all of the CW that came were brought in legally. They also were brought in without family, all were brought in as "single status" workers except for a very few that qualified with income and management position stature.
Those people are gone now.(or here under the Fed. program)
All of the possible young people that fit into the mentioned group that would qualify under the requirements were all born here and thus are US Cit.so do not qualify.
This "new rule" will not even help our "stateless children"

Wendy Doromal said...

4:48 There are young people in the CNMI who were brought in by their parents and became out of status after the CNRA went into affect. It absolutely WILL affect them. Some went to school in the CNMI, including NMC.

Of course, there must be legislation to grant permanent residency to the stateless children, the CNMI permanent residents, the legal, long-term foreign workers and the children and spouses of those who fall within these categories.

Anonymous said...

There will not be improved status here, only a longer transition period, it is the only thing that Ben Fitial and Kilili agree on, meaning another 5 years to 2019, so don't hold your breath on anything big happening before then.

Anonymous said...

Im will benefit from this executive order.Because of the federelization of the island i was put on limbo. I can now further my career if granted work permit. I came to the island when i was 8 yrs old and graduated college at NMC.I can prove i came here when i was 8 cause i got copies of my entry permit and offically signed elementary,high school transcripts by my principal from Calvary Christian Academy private school so i did not ever benefit form "american taxpayer money".

Wendy Doromal said...

8:47 Best wishes to you! May this just be a first step to a pathway to citizenship for you!

Anonymous said...

I THINK THIS IS THE RIGHT TIME THE PEOPLE OF UNITED STATE OF AMERICA TO CHOOSE THE GOOD LEADER THIS COMING NOV.ELECTION.......